Current Opinion On The Relationship Between Hypnosis And Depression

A review of the literature indicates that the consensus of opinion is not, in fact, strongly opposed to the use of hypnosis in the treatment of depression. Commentators vary, however, in their readiness to accept the use of hypnosis unconditionally . Yapko (1992) advocates a broad-based acceptance: 'As for the specific contraindications to the use of hypnosis, it may seem a bold statement to make, but I am aware of no such contraindications' (p. 186). Clarke &

International Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis. Edited by G. D. Burrows, R. O. Stanley and P. B. Bloom © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Jackson (1983) adopt a similar viewpoint, suggesting that the notion that hypnosis has no place in the treatment of depression is a 'bit of clinical folklore'. Miller (1984) produces a chapter on the application of hypnosis to the treatment of depression without questioning the appropriateness of this approach. Crasilneck & Hall (1985) advocate a more conservative view, listing some contraindications but concluding that 'while hypnosis can be used in treating depression, we strongly advise that such use be only by therapists adequately grounded in psychodynamics; even then it should be used with caution and care' (p. 324).

Given that significant differences exist between respected authors in the area, what accounts for this variation?

Hynotism and Self Hypnosis

Hynotism and Self Hypnosis

HYPNOTISM is by no means a new art. True, it has been developed into a science in comparatively recent years. But the principles of thought control have been used for thousands of years in India, ancient Egypt, among the Persians, Chinese and in many other ancient lands. Miracles of healing by the spoken word and laying on of hands are recorded in many early writings.

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