An Illustrative Metaphor

Each metaphor we construct as therapists to address issues of depression or, indeed, any other problem needs to contain sound therapeutic characteristics. The following is an example, a metaphor based on a real case. Two men were referred to me by their workplace physician following an industrial accident in which both were involved. (In telling this metaphor, their names have been altered and specific details of the accident and workplace environment deleted so as to protect their identity.)...

Hypnosis With Eating Disordered Patients

Hypnotizability and Eating Disorders Although the use of hypnosis with depressed and suicidal patients has been an issue of contention among researchers and clinicians, there appears to be a higher level of agreement regarding the use of hypnosis for the treatment of bulimia. A number of studies have suggested that bulimic patients may be more hypnotizable than those suffering from anorexia, evidenced by a greater capacity for dissociation (Griffiths & Channon-Little, 1995). Pettinati, Home,...

Irving Kirsch

In June, 2003, British drug regulators warned that paroxetine causes depressed children to become more suicidal and should not be prescribed for them.1 Six months later, the ban was extended to all but one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). The exception was fluoxetine (Prozac). Then, in September 2004, it was reported that the risk of suicide was increased by fluoxetine as well. Why should SSRIs increase the risk of suicide only in children In fact, the data suggest that the risk...

Cognitive Behavior and Interpersonal Therapies

Lynn and Kirsch (2006) contended that hypnosis can maximize treatment gains of empirically supported methods for the amelioration of anxiety and depression. Consideration of hypnosis as an adjunctive treatment for anxiety and mood disorders in the context of cognitive-behavior therapy and interpersonal therapy will provide the necessary framework for our discussion of the case of Ms. S. and the 5-Finger Technique that follows. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal approaches are...

Hypnosis And Building Realistic Expectancy

One of the strongest factors contributing to the viability of hypnosis as an intervention tool is termed expectancy (Coe, 1993 Kirsch, 2000). Expectancy refers to that quality of the client's belief system that leads him or her to believe that the procedure implemented by the clinician will produce a therapeutic result. Positive expectancy for treatment involves multiple perceptions The clinician is seen as credible and benevolent the procedure seems to have a plausible, perhaps even...

Editors Summary

Depression has many causes, and there are many risk factors that can lead to the onset of depressive episodes treatment can be aimed at both symptoms and risk factors. Successful psychotherapeutic treatments generally teach specific life-enhancing skills and define the client's role as an active one in the learning process. Hypnosis can enhance the acquisition of key skills that can serve to reduce depression's severity, duration, and likelihood of recurrence. Positive expectancy for the...

Hypnosis For Trauma And Ptsd Symptoms

Applications of hypnosis and imagery in the treatment of trauma-related conditions have been widely reported in the professional literature for more than 150 years. In the mid-1800s, James Esdaile used hypnotic analgesia to help patients through surgical procedures without the aid of anesthesia. In the late 1800s, Freud and his contemporary, Pierre Janet, each documented extensive hypnotic work with women suffering from what were then called hysterical conditions, more currently believed to be...

What If My Client Is Not Specific About Goals

Global thinking is a common cognitive style associated with depression (Yapko 1997, 2001). Thus, it is likely that depressed clients will come up with a too-global response to questions meant to help them shift their goals in a more approach-oriented direction. For example, Mary stated that she wanted to feel more relaxed and be more outgoing. Having such global (i.e., nonspecific) goals brings us back to the earlier analogy of throwing darts at a blank wall. Consequently, in an effort to...

Selfimage Thinking

Identification and confrontation of internal dialogue are promising ways to recognize maladaptive habits pertaining to chunking logic and repetitive retrieval of racket feelings. However, it is generally inadvisable to simply educate clients to monitor the self-statements and then attempt to stop them. Some studies have shown that the suppression of thought can be a factor in the development and continuance of a variety of psychological disorders (Borton, Markowitz, & Dieterich,...

Hypnotic Age Progression Intervention Strategies

Age progression, as employed in the Back from the Future technique described later, has been used in many ways over the years. Milton Erickson (1954) described a technique of age progression facilitated by hypnosis. He calls this intervention a pseudo-orientation in time as a hypnotherapeutic procedure (p. 261). Erickson would first guide the patient into a state of hypnosis and then have the patient travel forward into the future to a time and space in which the patient had already achieved a...

Depression Pain And Ptsd

Recent advances in psychoneuroimmunology PNI research have indicated a strong connection between emotional and physical pain Dillard, 2002 Melzack amp Wall, 1973 . For example, antidepressants that increase levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the limbic system can also decrease chronic pain for many individuals. Pain and emotions share common nerve pathways from the periphery of the body to the spinal cord, where they are sorted for intensity and forwarded to the brain. Positron emission...

Poetic Beginning

Clinical writing, the kind that fills the pages of this volume with professional jargon and insightful analysis, can only partially illuminate the complexity of depression. There is, however, another kind of written language, a use of words that conveys a type of depth, emotion and clarity that clinical jargon usually cannot equal. It is the language of the poet, a language that is rich with imagery and holds the power to move the spirit. It is my privilege to know a young woman who has...

Hypnosis And The Language Of Feelings

In the context of history taking and rapport development, it is essential to develop an appreciation for and knowledge of the child's language of feelings and his or her ability to identify and talk about feelings. In the unfolding of their personal history, desired outcomes are named in order to be able to later utilize their own ideas and language in the formulation of hypnotic suggestions and strategies. This may be done through the use of simple dichotomies in younger children, in other...

Contributors

Psych., is a clinical psychologist at Foothills Medical Centre and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He is the president of the Canadian Society of Clinical Hypnosis Alberta Division. He is a member of the Canadian Psychological Association, the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, and the International Society of Hypnosis. Dr. Alladin was trained as a psychiatric nurse and a social...