The Things We Cling To VI

What are we clinging to What is our handhold What we are clinging to is the world itself. In Buddhism the word world has a broader connotation than it has in ordinary usage. It refers to all things, to the totality. It does not refer just to human beings, or celestial beings, or gods, or beasts, or the denizens of hell, or demons, or hungry ghosts, or titans, or any particular realm of existence at all. What the word world refers to here is the whole lot taken together. To know the world is...

Foreword

In 1956, the Venerable Buddhadasa Bhikkhu gave a series of lectures to a group of prospective judges, which were subsequently edited and arranged into what became The Handbook for Mankind. Since then, the success of this small book has been astounding. Well over 100,000 copies have been printed in Thai, and the book still enjoys widespread popularity, more than three decades after the original talks. The reason for The Handbook s endurance is clear that the Venerable Buddhadasa offers fresh...

Info

The Purification consisting of freedom from misunderstanding implies the elimination of all false views, both inborn and acquired. It covers the whole range from irrational belief in magic to false ideas as to the true nature of things - for instance, regarding this body and mind as something enduring, something worthwhile, a self seeing it as animal, human being, celestial being, or god, or as something magical or sacred failing to perceive that it consists of just the four elements, or of...

Grasping And Clinging iv

How can we get away from and become completely independent of things, all of which are transient, unsatisfactory and devoid of selfhood The answer is that we have to find out what is the cause of our desiring those things and clinging to them. Knowing that cause, we shall be in a position to eliminate clinging completely. Buddhists recognize four different kinds of clinging or attachment. 1) Sensual attachment (Kamupanana) is clinging to attractive and desirable sense objects. It is the...

Looking at Buddhism I

If we open any recent book on the origins of religion, we find that there is one point on which all authors are in agreement. They all agree in saying that religion arose in the world out of fear. Primitive forest-dwelling man feared thunder and lightning, darkness and storms, and various things about him that he was unable to understand or control. His method of avoiding the danger he saw in these phenomena was to demonstrate either humility and submission or homage and reverence, depending on...

The True Nature of Things II

The word religion has a broader meaning than the word morality. Morality has to do with behavior and happiness, and is basically the same the world over. A religion is a system of practice of a high order. The ways of practice advocated by the various religions differ greatly. Morality made us good people, behaving in accordance with the general principles of community life and in such a way as to cause no distress to ourselves or others. But though a person may be thoroughly moral, he may...

Three Universal Characteristics m

We shall now discuss in detail the three characteristics common to all things, namely impermanence, unsatisfactoriness (suffering) and non-selfhood. All things whatsoever have the property of changing incessantly they are unstable. All things whatsoever have the characteristic of unsatisfactoriness seeing them evokes disillusionment and disenchantment in anyone having clear insight into their nature. Nothing whatsoever is such that we are justified in regarding it as mine. To our normally...

The Handbook for Mankind

The true nature of things 20 III. Three universal characteristics 32 IV. Grasping and clinging 47 V. The threefold training 57 VI. The things we cling to 67 VII. Insight by the nature method 80 VIII. Insight by organized training 96 The seven purifications, etc 99 IX. Emancipation from the world 114

Insight by Organized Training viii

Now we shall deal with the organized systems of insight training, which were not taught by the Buddha but were developed by later teachers. This kind of practice is suitable for people at a fairly undeveloped stage, who still cannot perceive the unsatisfactoriness of worldly existence with their own eyes, naturally. This doesn't mean, however, that the results obtained by these systems have any special qualities not obtainable by the nature method, because when we examine the Tipitaka closely,...

Emancipation from the World IX

Vipassana meditation is mental training aimed at raising the mind to such a level that it is no longer subject to suffering. The mind breaks free from suffering by virtue of the clear knowledge that nothing is worth grasping at or clinging to. This knowledge deprives worldly things of their ability to lead the mind into further thoughtless liking or disliking. Having this knowledge, the mind transcends the worldly condition and attains the level known as the Supramundane Plane...